wandering

12 WAYS TO PREVENT, AND RESPOND TO, ASD WANDERING

11) LEARN FROM OTHER INCIDENTS

Researching and reviewing actual incidents that have occurred within our community can be tough to do. The stories are often heart-wrenching to read, and many of us simply cannot bring ourselves to read them. But learning from other situations can help us protect our children and adults by strengthening our understanding of what possible incidents can occur to us on an individual level.
::  Look for news stories and research other wandering stories from fellow autism parents.
:: Sign up for Google Alerts to send you an email when a wandering incident in the autism community has occurred. (use keywords like “autistic missing” and “autism wandered”)
:: Familiarize yourself with the details of news stories and other accounts.
For example:
If a child was able to leave the home because of a small rip in the door-screen that they could enlarge and escape through, this may help you identify small rips in any door or window screens you may have in your home.
If a child slipped away during a family gathering, this may help you recognize precautions to put in place during times of commotion, gatherings, holiday parties, etc.
If a child was found because of a specific system that law enforcement has in place, such as cell-phone alerts to nearby neighbors, this may prompt you to ask your local law agencies to get the same technology in your county or city.
If a child wandered from a school playground because the school campus wasn’t fenced, this may prompt you to look at your child’s school to identify security breaches.
Learning from other stories may help you assess your own home and situations so that wandering may be prevented and response measures may be enhanced.
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