restraint & seclusion

10 RESTRAINT & SECLUSION TIPS FOR PARENTS

7) CREATE SAFEGUARDS

::  Create a custom student profile for your child that outlines special medical conditions and needs, emergency contact information, a photo of your child, likes and dislikes, escalation triggers, de-escalation methods and instructions prohibiting restraint and seclusion.
:: Note in your child’s profile that school personnel is NOT to call the police in the event of escalation, but to call you instead.
:: Make sure the profile is readily accessible to school staff only, and that it is updated as needed.
:: If possible, seek your child’s input on what should go into his/her profile.
:: Student profiles should note any medical conditions that contraindicate the use of restraint and seclusion, such as asthma, obesity, certain gastrointestinal disorders, heart and pulmonary disorders, etc.
:: Back up your child’s positive IEP content with a “No Restraint Letter.” Many parents have used this letter designed by the RespectABILITY Law Center, to ensure that their wishes are known to the school.
:: Back up the “No Restraint Letter” with letters from your child’s medical doctor and (if relevant) psychologist or professional counselor, stating why the use of these techniques poses a health and safety hazard to your child and must not be used. Make sure the language of the letter becomes incorporated into your child’s IEP goals.
:: Create Custom Calming Tools. You know your child best! Use this knowledge to provide your child’s school with tools and tips on how to keep school a positive experience for your child.
:: Use what your child loves & will respond to. If possible, seek your child’s involvement in creating calming tools.
:: Ask your child’s school for help with any and all tools - sometimes schools will allow an autism specialist to come in and observe your child and assist you in creating custom calming tools.
Much of the above content was developed by The Alliance to Prevent Restraint, Aversive Interventions & Seclusion (APRAIS), of which NAA is a member. For more in-depth information, visit Tash.org & download its free Parent Toolkit: Shouldn’t School Be Safe?
« Previous Next »

GO TO MAIN NAA SITE  |  ABOUT NAA  |  SAFETY RESOURCES  |  CONTACT NAA

Learn 12 ways to prevent, &
respond to, ASD wandering >>>

Read 10 tips for parents >>>

Here are five things parents can do >>>

What to look for & ways to
address it >>>

SIGN UP FOR ALERTS ::
INFORMATION FOR FIRST RESPONDERS ::
INFORMATION FOR PHYSICIANS ::
INFORMATION FOR SCHOOL PERSONNEL ::
JOIN A FACEBOOK SAFETY GROUP ::

SHOP NAA

NAA’S BIG RED SAFETY BOX PROGRAM

LEARN MORE | BECOME A SPONSOR

CONTACT US  |  VISIT OUR SPONSORS  |  PRIVACY POLICY

All content within this site is for INFORMATIONAL purposes only and does not constitute as medical advice or an endorsement of any safety service, device, method, product, organization or vendor.
National Autism Association is not responsible for the content produced by, or the services rendered by, any third party that is referenced, or to which access may be provided via this safety site.

BE SURE TO ADVISE AND CONSULT WITH THE CHILD’S HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS CONCERNING THE USE OF THIS SAFETY CONTENT.