restraint & seclusion

ABOUT AUTISM RESTRAINT & SECLUSION

In May, 2009 the US Government Accountability Office (GAO) completed its nationwide investigation into the use of restraint & seclusion in public schools. The result of its findings concluded that no federal laws were in place to keep educators from using dangerous and abusive methods to restrain or seclude a student.
The investigation found that many states had no laws in place, and that existing state-to-state laws were ‘widely divergent.’ It also showed that although the Children’s Health Act of 2000 protects children from abusive practices in facilities such as hospitals, residential treatment centers and residential group homes, it does not protect children from such practices in schools.
Read full report here: http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09719t.pdf

DEFINITIONS

RESTRAINT: Restraint is any manual method, physical or mechanical device, material, or equipment that immobilizes or reduces the ability of an individual.
SECLUSION: The involuntary confinement of an individual alone in a room or area from which they are physically prevented from leaving.

TYPES OF RESTRAINT

Prone Restraint means that the child is laid in the facedown position.
Supine Restraint means that the child is laid in the face-up position.
Physical restraints involve a person applying various holds using their arms, legs or body weight to immobilize an individual or bring an individual to the floor.
Mechanical restraints include straps, cuffs, body/blanket wraps, helmets and other devices to prevent movement and or sense perception, often by pinning an individual’s limbs to a splint, wall, bed, chair or floor.
Chemical restraints rely on medication to dull an individual’s ability to move and/or think.
Aversive Intervention: According to the Alliance to Prevent Restraint, Aversive Interventions and Seclusion (APRAIS), Aversive Interventions are the deliberate infliction of physical and emotional pain and suffering for the purpose of changing or controlling an individual’s behavior.

ABOUT AUTISM MORTALITY

Autism is a diagnosis that represents many symptoms and behavioral tendencies, some of which can lead to serious health and safety risks including death. In 2008, Danish researchers found that the mortality rate among the autism population is twice as high as in the general population. Contributing factors include death by asphyxiation as the result of improper restraint.

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